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Is It Possible To Deal With Severs Disease In The Home?

Overview

Sever?s Disease is one of the most common overuse injuries affecting children during their secondary growth spurts and is described as a self-limiting condition resolving naturally with skeletal maturity 1. It is suggested to be caused by progressive microtrauma to the bone-cartilage interface in the calcaneal apophysis partly due to large traction forces in the Achilles tendon. The current standard treatment consists mainly of rest, and waiting for skeletal maturity.

Causes

The exact cause of Severs disease is not completely understood. It is thought to be associated with an overuse type injury, in which repetitive stress from the Achilles tendon causes a portion of the growth plate to pull away from the heel. In medical terms, this is described as cyclic, micro-avulsion type fractures to the calcaneal apophyses.

Symptoms

A few signs and symptoms point to Sever?s disease, which may affect one or both heels. These include pain at the heel or around the Achilles tendon, Heel pain during physical exercise, especially activities that require running or jumping, worsening of pain after exercise, a tender swelling or bulge on the heel that is sore to touch, calf muscle stiffness first thing in the morning, limping, a tendency to tiptoe.

Diagnosis

The x-ray appearance usually shows the apophysis to be divided into multiple parts. Sometimes a series of small fragments is noted. Asymptomatic heels may also show x-ray findings of resporption, fragmentation and increased density. But they occur much less often in the normal foot. Pulling or ?traction? of the Achilles tendon on the unossified growth plate is a likely contributing factor to Sever?s disease. Excessive pronation and a tight Achilles and limited dorsiflexion may also contribute to the development of this condition.

Non Surgical Treatment

Treatment may consist of one or more of the following, Elevating the heel, Stretching hamstring and calf muscles 2-3 times daily, Using R.I.C.E. (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation), Foot orthotics, Medication, Physical therapy, Icing daily (morning), Heating therapy, Open back shoe are best and avoid high heel shoe. The Strickland Protocol has shown a positive response in patients with a mean return to sport in less than 3 weeks.

Recovery

It may take several weeks or months for the pain to completely stop. When the pain is completely gone, your child may slowly return to his or her previous level of activity.